True Strange Library

The curious collection of a slightly mad scientist

Hepatitis C virus entry factor identified

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 170 million people worldwide. Approximately 80 percent of infections lead to chronic illness including fibrosis, cirrhosis, cancer and also hepatic iron overload. A new study completed by researchers at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine reveals that HCV not only alters expression of the iron-uptake receptor known as transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) but that TfR1 also mediates HCV entry.

“We have not yet discovered a cure for Hepatitis C, however discovering the relationship between HCV and TfR1 sheds more light on the complex, multistep process required for the virus to get into liver cells,” said senior author Susan L. Uprichard, PhD, virologist and Director of Hepatology Research, Loyola. “This new knowledge reveals important insight into how the virus interacts with and changes our liver cells for its own benefit. As such, it may facilitate the development of entry inhibitors or treatments for HCV-associated iron overload.” The research findings could also potentially be used in the clinical setting for the care of patients not only for those with chronic liver disease but also for post liver transplant where it might help prevent infection of a new liver or at least slow disease progression. Uprichard says her HCV research lays important groundwork. “This research is like finding one of the four corners of a puzzle,” she said. “It creates a key building block toward finding a medical solution to Hepatitis C.”

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This entry was posted on June 11, 2013 by in Biology, Technology.
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