Explain This: Crazy Crack in Surface of Pacific Ocean (California Coast)

Can you guess what caused this UEP (Unexplained Earth Phenomena)? I took this photo on August 21, 2017 at 3:42 PM while visiting the lighthouse at Point Bonita. I remember feeling strangely unsettled when I looked out at the ocean. It first, I saw it, but I didn’t see it. I mean, it was clear, but I subconsciously assumed it was a reflection from clouds or sunlight. When I took a real look, I was baffled. It was a physical thing out there in the ocean so big that it stretched to the horizon. What the heck?! As the size of it dawned on me, I thought, “That’s impossible… unfrozen water does not crack.” From my lucid dreaming experiences, I considered I might be dreaming, but gravity worked fine. I could read text and it did not change when I read it a second time. I was not dreaming.

Image: Crack in the Pacific Ocean, Point Bonita Lighthouse, Aug 2017 by Xeno (TrueStrage.com)

I took this high resolution photo which I thought I’d post someday. Today is that day.
Click the image to blow it up and have a closer look. Can you explain this crazy crack off the cost of California? It’s pretty amazing. Hint: The Pacific Ocean does not freeze in here August or ever, obviously.

Here’s a map showing where this was in relation to the Golden Gate Bridge:

I was where the red locator is and the direction of the photo is out into the ocean. I was looking out in the direction of the words “Point Bonita Lighthouse” in the photo below, as if the word “Point” was the point of an arrow. In the Google Maps satelite view there is no structure like I saw.

I have a few theories, but none of them completely works for me given the scale of this and the way it looks. Is this a glitch in the matrix? Whatever it is, it can’t be a good sign.

Here’s my best logical guess: Global ocean temperatures have been rising and perhaps what you are seeing here is what remains of a since-gone-cargo-ship cutting through a truly massive algal bloom covering most of the visible ocean. There is no way ordinary motion of the ocean tides would rip floating plants along a huge line like that without some massive quake we would all know about.  That’s just a guess.

I was going to have some crab for my birthday tomorrow. I’ll settle for a small crab cake and see if it agrees with me. It has been over five months since I photographed the crack in the Pacific Ocean. Perhaps ocean temperatures have gone down with the Winter, removing the algae (if that’s what it was) and making the shellfish safe to eat.

Some types of algae naturally produce toxins. When these algae grow rapidly, they create a bloom that can kill off other species in the same ecosystem. A number of species (including Alexandrium fundyense and Dinophysis acuminate) produces toxins that accumulate in shellfish. People who eat these shellfish can experience paralytic or diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. So these blooms can hurt aquatic ecosystems, fisheries, and people. …

… sea-surface temperature has emerged as the most important factor contributing to recent changes in algal blooms.

If these patterns continue into the 21st century, the consequences for oceanic ecosystems and human health could potentially be serious. – Link

What can we do about this, assuming it is a massive algal bloom? Could Fukushima be heating the Pacific Ocean? Some think so.

On February 3rd, 2017 the Guardian had an article which stated “Fukushima nuclear reactor radiation at highest level since 2011 meltdown.” Fukushima is not a Japanese problem. It is a world wide problem as I see it and every government should be pitching in to try to save the planet.

My master plan is to build a giant solar array across Africa and use the power to employ people and make swarms of robots that will clean up the mess at Fukushima. We can use our tools to organize and save ourselves as a species.

Here’s where we are with the same map today.

Before you freak out too much, compare the color bar legends at the bottom of each map. They are different. Notice that what is yellow in the more recent image below (0.5 degrees) is turqoise in the image above. Still, there is a notable difference if you look at the amount of surface in the 2 to 4 degree range between the two. It looks to me like April of 2013’s ocean surface was cooler than it is in January 2015. It would take an expert familiar with long term trends in these maps to make sense of it, but we can speculate.

If you are reading this after January 7, 2018, take a look at the ocean surface temperature today and compare it to my snapshot above, checking of course, to see if the color bar legend is the same.

Share this please and help spread the idea. We need to all get together this year and start building our massive army of Fukushima clean up robots. The first world-wide project backed by every country! Imagine it! Make it happen!

TrueStrange.com

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