Vampire Origami is Partly Invisible in a Mirror

Here’s an illusion that perhaps should have won the 2017 contest. From the star ratings on the web site, it seems visitors like this choice. The winner with the moving speckles and second place, those crooked appearing wallpaper lines, were strong illusions, but not as surprising. The wall paper lines were a variation on an illusion that is already well known. Here it is, the vampire origami:

Author description: There are three objects that look identical, but when we reflect them in the mirrors, different parts disappear. For the first object the rooster at the bottom disappears, for the second object the upper half of the structure disappears, and for the third object the lower half disappears. They all come from the height-reversal property of horizontal pictures; when we interpret a horizontal picture as a 3D object, the perceived height is reversed in the mirror. In fact the three objects are a mixture of 3D structures and 2D pictures, and the 2D pictures create unusual visual effects.

The video submissions are fun to browse at IllusionOfTheYear. After all, in one way or another, life itself is a grand illusion.

The WakingTimes web site has this nice quote:

We live in a world of illusion. So many of the concerns that occupy the mind and the tasks that fill the calendar arise from planted impulses to become someone or something that we are not.

While I like this quote, regarding the rest of the article there, I’m not of the view that “the Man” is out to stick it to “the People,” or to control you for evil reasons with a carefully planned agenda. Sure, powerful groups want to control things, to stay in power, to assert their will, to make money, etc., but the most powerful aren’t stupid, and they know by now that it is a balancing act that keeps power working. Too much order or control and systems die. It seems to be a universal rule at many levels. Historically, tyranny is self-limiting; even where it wins, it is not sustainable. Neither, obviously, is anarchy.

Vitality requires a measure of both order and chaos, freedom and oversight. A person instantly frozen solid is molecularly “more orderly,” but they are no longer alive, nor is a person alive whose molecules are no longer organized into fuctional tissues and organs.

A useful application of this is in how we approach our indvidual creativity. If the mind gets too organized, new ideas do not appear; we get rigid, rejecting too much. If we are too chaotic we conversely accept too much and our ideas never ripen nor become applicable. Food for thought.

Enjoy the day’s illusions.


TrueStrange.com

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